Veterinary Hopsital, Distillery Road, Wexford+ 353 (0)53 914 5755theveterinarycentre@eircom.net

Large Animal Care:

O’Shea & Bramley

aim to provide a veterinary service for all the animals kept by our clients. Within the Farm Department we routinely treat dairy and beef cattle, flocks of sheep both large and small, commercial and pet pigs, goats, camelids and poultry.

As well as provision of treatment for sick animals we will provide preventive herd and flock health advice which may be in the form of a written health plan. We are happy to provide a service for all livestock owners regardless of the size of their enterprise throughout Wexford.

Any queries you may have regarding your stock or regulations, please contact one of our highly trained staff and they will assist you where possible.

To arrange a visit out please contact us on 0539145755. A full list of our Terms & conditions is available for Downlad Here

CATTLE FERTILITY & ROUTINE VISITS:

  • MASTITIS MANAGEMENT:
  • FOOT PARING:
  • TB TESTING & BRUCELLOSIS:
  • HERD HEALTH:
  • SHEEP FERTILITY & ROUTINE VISITS:
  • DNA TESTING & PARENTAGEIN HOUSE LABORATORY
  • REFERAL LABORATORY WHERE NECESSARYWASTE MANAGEMENT
  • RETAIL SHOP OF ALL LARGE ANIMAL PRODUCTS AT COMPETITIVE PRICES
  • PRESCRIPTIONS AVAILABLE ON REQUEST
  • POM AND NON POM STOCK (in accordance to Depart. Of Ag Guidelines)
  • 24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICES
  • VACCINATION PROGRAMME

We are happy to offer the following services listed by species in addition to treatment of sick animals.

Cattle:

Fully mobile ultrasound pregnancy testing service and routine fertility visits, foot trimming, tuberculosis testing,: herd health advice on disease such as BVD, leptospirosis, johnes disease and parasite prevention: DNA sampling for parentage. Blood analysis work such as haematology and biochemistry (for example metabolic profiles) and faecal worm egg counts are done in our own lab, normally with same day results. We can arrange for bull fertility testing in conjunction with professional colleagues.

Sheep:

For our large commercial flocks we appreciate being involved in all aspects of the health management including parasite control and feeding. We will undertake any necessary blood sampling such as MV testing or metabolic profiles. For smaller flocks we will assist with vaccination programmes, treating lameness and other health issues, feeding and parasite control advice.

Goats:

Disbudding and castration of kids under general anaesthetic, parasite control, health advice.

Pigs:

Routine health advice, parasite control, general treatment including castration under anaesthetic of pet pigs.

We are happy to give telephone advice although clinical work will normally take priority. If you wish to discuss a case which is likely to need a visit, or of you need advice urgently, please make this clear to the receptionist when you call.

Worm Dosing &Parasite Control at Grass:

Parasites including worms can cause over 50% of animal disease problems. The 3 most significant worms causing disease in cattle are:

  • 1) Stomach & Gut Worms
  • 2) Lung Worm (Hoose)
  • 3) Fluke

Heavy parasite burdens in cattle & sheep can lead to serious disease, major economic loss due to lack of thrive, even death. Light infestations may exacerbate other diseases and cause less obvious ill-thrift.

STOMACH & GUT WORMS:

The most typical clinical signs of stomach & gut worms are diarrohea and weight loss. Control of gut worms depends on grazing management and appropriate use of anthelminitics.
Grazing management: The objective is to reduce the concentration of infective larvae on pasture and so reduce the parasite challenge to grazing cattle. New or reseeded pastures should have very low numbers of infective larvae initially. Pastures subject to rotational grazing generally have lower numbers of infective larvae than those under continuous grazing.

Anthelmintics:

Anthelmintics must be used carefully in order to benefit both animals and avoid resistance.

a) Adult cows:

It is rare for adult cows to show any clinical signs of gut worm infestations however adult cows can benefit from treatment showing increase in milk yield and improved fertility.

b) Second Season Grazers:

These animals are not fully immune to gut worms and can experience production losses and occasionally disease. Studies have shown regular dosing and anthelmintics treatment is beneficial.

c) First Season Grazers:

These calves initially have no immunity to parasites and are at risk of clinical as well as sub clinical gut worm infestations.

Suckler Calves:

Their greatest risk periods are after weaning in late summer and autumn.

Dairy Calves:

Dairy calves are exposed to infection as soon as they are turned out. Clinically significant infections can be evident within a couple of months of turn-out
Calves can suffer sub clinical losses even earlier. Therefore it is recommended that both beef & dairy calves receive their first dose 3 weeks after turn out and at regular intervals thereafter depending on product type, consult your vet for frequency of dosing.

LUNGWORM (HOOSE):

Clinical signs of lungworm infection include coughing and difficulty in breathing. Affected cattle have an increased susceptibility to viral and bacterial pneumonia. At the start of each grazing season cattle may have very little or no immunity to lungworm and thus are susceptible to new infections again. The highest challenge risk periods for animals are late summer and autumn. It is recommended that for calves & young stock the 1st dose be given 3 weeks after turnout and at regular intervals thereafter depending on product.

Cows:

If cows that are partly immune to hoose are exposed to heavy larval challenged from pasture they may develop severe coughing and or milk drop as their immune system kills the migrating larvae. If you notice any of these signs consult you veterinary practitioner for further investigation.

FLUKE:

Liver fluke is a common infection in cattle and sheep. Disease is seen in animals of all ages. Typical symptoms are condition loss, lower productivity and increased susceptibility to other diseases.

First Season Grazers:

It may be unnecessary to treat with flukicide until the autumn and or at housing. Advice may vary depending on weather; fluke forecast and farm history so farmers should discuss control with their vet.
Second Season Grazers: Older cattle and cows are commonly treated at housing. If cattle have not been treated at housing then treatment with a flukicide effective against adult liver fluke before turn out will ensure that contamination of the pasture with fluke +eggs is kept to a minimum.

Sheep:

If sheep are present on farm, they must be included in a liver fluke control programme – the fluke is exactly the same as that seen in cattle. It is very important to be aware of dosing failure in sheep due to fluke resistance to triclabendazole, we recommend to check faecal samples, 2 weeks post dosing to evaluate if the treatment has been effective.

Copyright of Veterinary Hospital Wexford 2013. Designed by C&R Print
MENU